Results tagged as "citi foundation"

  • Introducing the City Accelerator’s Third Cohort

    By Kristen Scheyder, Senior Program Officer, Citi Foundation, and Steven Bosacker, Director of Public Sector Innovation, Living Cities March 17, 2016 11:45 AM

    They want to fortify, scale, and sustain. From seawalls to stairs, streetlights to stormwater, Pittsburgh, Saint Paul, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C. are setting ambitious targets as they join the City Accelerator’s Infrastructure Finance cohort.

    In December 2015, the Citi Foundation and Living Cities invited approximately 40 of the nation’s largest cities for an opportunity to explore a new set of financing options to help address the funding gaps for high priority capital projects. Chiefs of staff and senior policy advisors to mayors, who form the Project on Municipal Innovation, submitted data-rich presentations in their applications to the City Accelerator. The desire for cities to build, maintain, and repair infrastructure that protects the future and the past was palpable and the need to fund projects differently is urgent.

    Acknowledging their budget constraints, limited means of additional revenue creation, and other challenges, the four cities selected for the Infrastructure Finance cohort are representative of cities throughout the country. Municipal leaders are searching for immediate and multi-generational strategies -- that is, ways the significant investment of previous centuries can be preserved and upgraded to make their cities thriving 21st century urban markets. Most of all, local governmental leaders want to increase equity by managing public assets and dollars more effectively so that low-income residents are beneficiaries of the built environment.

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  • Four Stories, Four Paths: Meet Kenny

    By Kenneth Huertas, Make Your Job Participant February 11, 2016 04:30 PM

    The Citi Foundation “Pathways to Progress Impact Video Series” demonstrates the impact of its U.S. program through the compelling stories of four young people who have participated in the initiative’s four core program paths: civic engagement, entrepreneurship training, mentorship, and summertime employment.

    I’ve never had a shortage of ideas.

    When I see a problem, I immediately start thinking of ways to address it. A successful business might start with a great idea, but without the right business plan and guidance a great idea might never be more than just that.

    The Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE) gave me the training I needed to bring my ideas to life while providing a much-needed service to my California community: A Touch of Eco, a mobile app connecting service providers to people in the market for an environmentally friendly car wash.

    What you don’t get to see in my video: Boxing taught me discipline, how to stay focused, and how to push myself. One of the coolest parts of the NFTE program was the parallel between boxing and building a business.

    When I’m in the boxing ring, I need to be able to think on my feet, recognize opportunity, and assess and take calculated risks. The coaching and courses at NFTE helped me hone these critical skills and apply them to the workplace.

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  • Four Stories, Four Paths: Meet Nathaniel

    By Nathaniel Jones, ServiceWorks Participant February 04, 2016 01:00 PM

    The Citi Foundation “Pathways to Progress Impact Video Series” demonstrates the impact of its U.S. program through the compelling stories of four young people who have participated in the initiative’s four core program paths: civic engagement, entrepreneurship training, mentorship, and summertime employment.

    I’ve always found classes and homework assignments to be a lot of fun but I typically kept to myself at school because I was so shy. I dreaded working in groups because I was never sure if I would know the right things to say or that my ideas really added any value.

    Then my guidance counselor suggested that I join ServiceWorks, a national program that uses volunteer service to help young people develop leadership and workplace skills.

    What you don’t get to see in my video: I underestimated the impact I could have. Before ServiceWorks, I didn’t realize that even small acts can make a big difference—and that I could personally gain something from giving to my community.

    When I started the program at their Jersey Cares host site, I got matched with a success coach and skills trainer, who both helped me identify my strengths and weaknesses, as well as my personal and professional goals. I also learned how to work in teams, where communication was key.

    ServiceWorks helped me find my voice.

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  • Four Stories, Four Paths: Meet Grace

    By Grace Marro, Summer Jobs Connect Participant January 28, 2016 12:30 PM

    The Citi Foundation “Pathways to Progress Impact Video Series” demonstrates the impact of its U.S. program through the compelling stories of four young people who have participated in the initiative’s four core program paths: civic engagement, entrepreneurship training, mentorship, and summertime employment.

    Whenever I got money as a gift or an allowance, I immediately spent it on the things I wanted, like clothes or a trip to the movies. I never thought about saving for my future. If I had 20 dollars in my wallet, that meant I had 20 dollars to spend.

    My experience with Summer Jobs Connect taught me the value of managing my money. I was able to set up my first bank account and I’ll never forget the day my first paycheck was deposited. A percentage automatically went to my new savings account. It made me feel so proud and in control of the decisions I was making about my money.

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  • Four Stories, Four Paths: Meet Nancy

    By By Nancy D’Haiti, iMentor Participant January 20, 2016 03:00 PM

    The Citi Foundation “Pathways to Progress Impact Video Series” demonstrates the impact of its U.S. program through the compelling stories of four young people who have participated in the initiative’s four core program paths: civic engagement, entrepreneurship training, mentorship, and summertime employment.

    When I got matched with my mentor, Mary, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I knew that iMentor, the school-based mentoring program that paired us, spent a lot of time vetting their mentors and put a lot of thought behind their mentor-mentee matches, but I wondered if we would get along.

    From our first exchange, it was clear that we had more in common than I had expected. We were both a little nervous but excited to get to know each other. And neither of us was originally from the U.S. We connected right away.

    What you don’t get to see in my video: After leaving my parents behind in Haiti to finish school, I had to grow up quickly and take on a lot more responsibility. My mentor, Mary, became an important part of my support system.

    Mary helped me with more than the college application and financial aid process. She helped me learn how handle stressful situations. Mary turned out to be more than a mentor. She became my friend.

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  • Reviving The American Dream

    By Brandee McHale, President of the Citi Foundation and Director of Corporate Citizenship, Citi December 10, 2015 03:15 PM

    I consider myself fortunate to do what I do: crafting and executing the Citi Foundation’s philanthropic strategy to support the economic needs of low-income communities. I get to look out and see how we can help make our cities better and more inclusive. This requires having a clear view of the economic and societal problems we face and, equally as important, an understanding of the psychological toll those problems have on families and communities.

    In both professional and personal conversations, I’ve noticed that many parents are no longer confident in a brighter future for their children. That’s not just my observation. In a recent NBC News online poll, nearly 60 percent of Americans said that today's children in the United States will grow up to be worse off than they are.

    How can that be, when the economy is showing concrete signs of rebounding? What’s so different today verses prior economic downturns that our belief in the American dream, once unwavering, is at risk?

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  • Citi and COP21: The 2015 Paris Climate Conference

    By Brandee McHale, President of the Citi Foundation and Director of Corporate Citizenship, Citi December 02, 2015 01:00 PM

    Citi has established combatting climate change as the top priority in our Sustainable Progress strategy, launched in February of this year. Our signature effort to combat climate change is our $100 Billion Environmental Finance goal, a goal to lend, invest and facilitate $100 billion over 10 years toward climate and environmental solutions, and we’re making significant progress towards that goal. In addition to our core business activities, we are also focused on the greening of our own operations. We have set science-based environmental footprint goals to reduce our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 35% by 2020 and by 80% by 2050 and to have 33% of our real estate portfolio to be LEED green building certified by 2020.

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  • Four Stories, Four Paths: The Road to Success

    By Brandee McHale, President of the Citi Foundation and Director of Corporate Citizenship, Citi October 21, 2015 10:00 AM

    All stories carry meaning. They hold information about the world we live in; they inform us about work we still have to do as a society and how effective our efforts have been in addressing change. I have witnessed the power of stories, first-hand. At the Citi Foundation, we work towards catalyzing collective impact—to inspire young people to believe in themselves and their future—by supporting diverse and high-performing organizations doing meaningful work on the ground and by leveraging our own expertise and resources. I am proud to highlight some of these stories of impact that are the result of collaboration and an investment far beyond dollars.

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  • Youth Entrepreneurs Score High on Leadership and Success

    By David Chubak, Head of Productivity, Citi October 16, 2015 10:00 AM

    Selecting one young person from three talented and business-savvy finalists at the Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE) National Youth Entrepreneurship Challenge, presented by the Citi Foundation, proved to be quite the exercise. On October 6, as part of the Challenge, 49 top young entrepreneurs, ages 16-24, from across the U.S., arrived in New York City for the opportunity to pitch their business ideas. The enthusiasm in the NFTE judges’ deliberation room for the final round was as palpable as the passion exhibited by the student participants on stage. We knew what was on the line – the chance to make a new business venture begin, with the help of a prize package worth approximately $25,000, including a college scholarship and access to business expertise.

    At Citi, I’m excited to work with colleagues who drive results with imagination and determination. Innovation has been key to scaling the company’s strategy across the globe. When I’m working to take our execution to the next level, much like these young entrepreneurs are taking the next step in growing their business and their skillset, it’s critical that I tap into Citi’s strengths. NFTE and the Citi Foundation are doing this as well by empowering youth: by developing their entrepreneurial mindset, equipping them with tools to problem-solve, and instilling confidence.

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  • Meet Fatema Khatun – Best Woman Entrepreneur in Bangladesh

    By Regina Seow, Managing Director, Corporate Affairs and Head of Corporate Citizenship, Asia Pacific, Citi September 10, 2015 01:45 PM

    Farah Rahman, Bangladesh Head of Corporate Affairs (left) and Regina Seow (right), meet with Fatema Khatun, named the CMA Best Women Entrepreneur of the Year for 2015 (center).

    It was an opportunity – in the form of a microloan - that changed Fatema Khatun’s life, and the lives of those around her.

    I recently had the privilege to personally meet three outstanding microentrepreneurs, including Fatema, at the 10th Citi Microentrepreneurship Awards (CMA) presentation ceremony in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The CMAs are supported by the Citi Foundation and happen in more than 30 countries around the world.

    Each microentrepreneur had a courageous story to share. Each had made a successful living from nothing and fought against poverty to make their way up the economic ladder.

    It was heartening to hear how their microenterprises have helped enable their children to be educated, created employment for their neighbors and inspired some in their village to start their own businesses. Their incredible stories really brought to life the aim of the CMA program, which is to raise awareness about the importance of microentrepreneurship and microfinance in supporting the financial inclusion and economic empowerment of low-income individuals.

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