Results tagged as "pathways to progress"

  • Investing in Today’s Youth to Become Tomorrow’s Leaders

    By Clint Creado, Senior Vice President and Director of Business Banking, Citi, Los Angeles Metro Area July 30, 2015 11:45 AM

    My experience volunteering for the ServiceWorks program with Pathways to Progress was a natural and fulfilling extension of my commitment to work with high school kids – something I’ve done for many years both as a mentor and teacher. I truly believe in the Citi Foundation’s Pathways to Progress concept – that we have a duty to invest in today’s youth who will be tomorrow’s leaders.

    ServiceWorks is a national program that uses volunteer service and civic engagement to help young people develop leadership and workplace skills, while enabling them to build their professional networks and connections to the community. Over the course of two months, I spent my time volunteering as a “Skills Trainer” and was responsible for delivering curriculum to 75 students on topics ranging from work ethic and communications, to relationship building, problem solving, and interview preparation. During these workshops I used personal experiences to bring the lessons to life and to connect with the audience. I use experiences ranging from the previous jobs I have held, to interviews that I have had, and my overall career progression. I emphasized that we all have to start somewhere and they should not be afraid of failure - the price of one “yes” is a whole bunch of “no’s”.

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  • The Lasting Power of Mentorship

    By Richard Young, Associate, Citi Investment Banking, New York City July 22, 2015 12:15 PM

    I am especially privileged to serve as a mentor because of the impact my own mentor has had on my life. Nearly 21 years after we were first introduced, we are still in touch, and have developed a lasting relationship. I credit much of the success I have found in my career to the relationship I have with my mentor, as well as the Management Leadership for Tomorrow (MLT) Career Prep Program, which I graduated from in 2007.

    MLT is a nonprofit organization that works to equip underrepresented minorities with the tools and skills they need to compete and succeed at the highest levels of the corporate, nonprofit and entrepreneurial sectors. It was through my involvement with MLT’s Career Prep Program that I gained an understanding of the financial services industry, which eventually led to me joining Citi’s Corporate and Investment Banking Division in 2008. MLT has transformed the lives of more than 4,000 Rising Leaders - and both Jeron and I are proud to be among that group.

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  • Pathways to Progress: Year One Update

    By Ed Skyler, Chairman of the Citi Foundation and Brandee McHale, President of the Citi Foundation and Director of Corporate Citizenship, Citi March 31, 2015 01:00 AM

    One year ago, the Citi Foundation launched Pathways to Progress, a three-year, $50 million initiative to provide 100,000 low-income young people in the United States with opportunities to develop workplace and leadership skills critical to competing in a 21st century economy. It was the largest commitment in our Foundation’s history. We focused on 10 of the largest U.S. cities, working alongside community partners, government leaders on the federal and local level, and Citi volunteers to deliver high-impact programs that help put young people on the road to professional and economic success.

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  • Volunteerism - Beyond the Numbers

    By Brandee McHale, President of the Citi Foundation and Director of Corporate Citizenship at Citi February 19, 2015 07:40 PM

    I am often asked what impact our volunteer efforts have on the hundreds of communities around the world where our employees give back year-round. We can start with the numbers: 70,000+ Citi employees, families and friends turned out for our annual Global Community Day in 2014, for example, contributing 350,000+ hours of service, across 93 countries and 479 cities. We know that 63,000+ meals were served, 31,000+ youth were engaged, and nearly 1,400 houses were built for families.

    But the real heart of our impact moves beyond the numbers, and is centered around the individual stories that result from these service experiences – both from those who act in service and those on the receiving end.

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  • Mentorship: The Power of Relationships for Academic and Career Success

    By Mike O’Brien, CEO, iMentor December 10, 2014 01:18 PM

    This post is part of a series inspired by Pathways to Progress, a Citi Foundation initiative that works with community partners, city officials and Citi employee volunteers to help low-income urban youth develop the leadership experience, professional skills and the workplace know-how they will need on their path towards college and careers. Follow the conversation on social media using the hashtag #Pathways2Progress

    Personal relationships are a crucial component to ensuring more young people get into college, graduate and move towards career success. Early in my career, the importance of supporting students became clear to me, during my first role as a high school teacher.

    In 2000, I joined a high school in East New York, Brooklyn, where I taught English and also served as the varsity basketball coach. As a teacher, I had 300 students each year in my classroom, but as a coach, I had only 12 students on the basketball team. The contrast between these two positions made clear to me how important personalized support can be for a student's educational and career development.

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  • Mentorship: A Shared Commitment towards Success

    By Jamie Anzellotti, SVP, Global Consumer Banking November 19, 2014 01:45 PM

    This post is part of a series inspired by Pathways to Progress, a Citi Foundation initiative that works with community partners, city officials and Citi employee volunteers to help low-income urban youth develop the leadership experience, professional skills and the workplace know-how they will need on their path towards college and careers. Follow the conversation on social media using the hashtag #Pathways2Progress

    Anika is a thriving sophomore at a university in California, a long way from her hometown of Brooklyn. When I first met Anika five years ago through iMentor as a high school sophomore, I could tell she was smart and determined, but travelling cross-country to live in another state can often be a challenge. And all I knew then about Anika was that she loved math, cheerleading and music - especially Justin Bieber - and that she had strong ethics and a passion for Italian food.

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  • Mentorship On and Off the Field

    By Curtis Granderson, New York Mets Outfielder, Chairman of the Board, Grand Kids Foundation November 05, 2014 09:05 AM

    This post is part of a series inspired by Pathways to Progress, a Citi Foundation initiative that works with community partners, city officials and Citi employee volunteers to help low-income urban youth develop the leadership experience, professional skills and the workplace know-how they will need on their path towards college and careers. Follow the conversation on social media using the hashtag #Pathways2Progress

    When you're a professional baseball player, you have to get used to people watching your every move on-the-field - each catch, play, and hit. What you quickly realize, however, is that what you do off-the-field is equally as important.

    Both of my parents are former educators, so growing up they instilled in me the importance of sharing learning experiences with others. As my career developed, I began to realize that people looked to me to teach them - in more ways than I ever could have imagined. Nearly a decade later, I'm still committed to make every opportunity I have to influence others count. In many ways, my career has provided me the ability to be a role model and mentor to so many people, sharing with them the lessons I've learned along the way.

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  • 9 Crazy Successful People And The First Jobs That Got Them Where They Are

    November 04, 2014 09:38 AM

    This post is inspired by Pathways to Progress, a Citi Foundation initiative that works with community partners, city officials and Citi employee volunteers to help low-income urban youth develop the leadership experience, professional skills and the workplace know-how they will need on their path towards college and careers. Follow the conversation on social media using the hashtag #Pathways2Progress

    Do you remember the summer you spent working as a lifeguard, or the semester you were a barista during college? Can you draw a parallel between that sunburned kid and the career person you are now? That inner youth is still in there, shaping every decision you make.

    The challenges you once faced are the ones you built around; the activities you did informed your worldview; and the things that used to light your world now inspire you. The most successful people capitalize on their inner child, infusing hard work with creativity and soul.

    We partnered with Citi, and talked with nine influential entrepreneurs, policymakers, and legendary artists about the surprising first jobs that made them who they are today. Whether you're already what wanted to be, or you're making your first career moves, you'll find major inspiration.

    This article is part of Citi's sponsorship of the Urban Progress section on Huffington Post.

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  • On the Path towards Economic Success: The Impact of Citi Foundation's Pathways to Progress through the eyes of Stella

    By Rosemary Byrnes, Senior Program Officer, U.S. Youth Economic Opportunities, Citi Foundation October 29, 2014 10:45 AM

    In March 2014, the Citi Foundation launched Pathways to Progress, a three-year, $50 million national commitment seeking to catalyze the economic progress of 100,000 low-income urban youth, ages 16-24, across ten of the largest U.S. cities: Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, Miami, New York City, Newark, St. Louis, San Francisco and Washington, D.C.

    The single largest commitment by the Foundation to date, Pathways to Progress is designed to provide youth with the skills and opportunities needed to succeed in the 21st century economy within four key paths: Entrepreneurship, Civic Leadership & Service, Mentorship and Summer Jobs. The initiative contributes to Citi's broader mission of enabling progress in the cities where we do business and complements the work of our Citi for Cities initiative. Pathways to Progress is reaching more than 22,000 young people in its first year alone. In addition, over the past six months, more than 160 Citi employees have devoted their time and talent in support of the initiative.

    But there's no better way to explore the early success of Pathways than through the eyes of the participants. Below we share the fourth story from Stella.

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  • On the Path towards Economic Success: The Impact of Citi Foundation's Pathways to Progress through the eyes of Tracey

    By Rosemary Byrnes, Senior Program Officer, U.S. Youth Economic Opportunities, Citi Foundation October 27, 2014 09:05 AM

    In March 2014, the Citi Foundation launched Pathways to Progress, a three-year, $50 million national commitment seeking to catalyze the economic progress of 100,000 low-income urban youth, ages 16-24, across ten of the largest U.S. cities: Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, Miami, New York City, Newark, St. Louis, San Francisco and Washington, D.C.

    The single largest commitment by the Foundation to date, Pathways to Progress is designed to provide youth with the skills and opportunities needed to succeed in the 21st century economy within four key paths: Entrepreneurship, Civic Leadership & Service, Mentorship and Summer Jobs. The initiative contributes to Citi's broader mission of enabling progress in the cities where we do business and complements the work of our Citi for Cities initiative. Pathways to Progress is reaching more than 22,000 young people in its first year alone. In addition, over the past six months, more than 160 Citi employees have devoted their time and talent in support of the initiative.

    But there's no better way to explore the early success of Pathways than through the eyes of the participants. Below we share the third story from Tracey.

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